Blood vessels (veh-suls): The system of flexible tubes—arteries, capillaries and veins—that carries blood through the body. Oxygen and nutrients are delivered by arteries to tiny, thin-walled capillaries that feed them to cells and pick up waste material, including carbon dioxide. Capillaries pass the waste to veins, which take the blood back to the heart and lungs, where carbon dioxide is let out through your breath as you exhale.
Water is the medium in which most cellular activities take place, including the transporting and burning of fat. In addition, drinking plenty of calorie-free water makes you feel full and eat less. Drink at least 1oz of water per 2lbs of bodyweight a day (that's 100oz for a 200-lb person). Keep a 20-oz water bottle at your desk, fill it five times a day, and you're set.
Growing numbers of Americans now have abdominal obesity (as measured by a large waist size), which puts them at a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. Abdominal fat (also known as visceral fat) pads the organs and is more likely to lead to unfavorable changes in blood sugar and other heart risk factors. Some people are predisposed to larger midsections because of their sex, genes, or ethnicity. But a reduced-carbohydrate diet that avoids added sugar, white flour, and starchy foods may help; so can intermittent fasting and regular exercise. More »
In this study, eating more protein helped overweight men preserve more lean mass when they lost weight. The men were put on a diet that gave them either 15% or 25% of energy from protein. But here’s a huge difference that you won’t see in the abstract: the low-protein group was vegetarian; the high-protein group got meat. (The study authors never explain why on earth they would do it like that).

Our diets are meant to have a balance of protein, carbohydrates, and fat. When you consume too little of one of these nutrients it means you are consuming too much of another nutrient. Most people who follow a very low-fat diet end up consuming an excess amount of carbohydrates. Too much of any nutrient can cause health problems. The Dietary Reference Intake (DRI) established the need for each one of these nutrients based on research for optimal health and weight. The DRI set the dietary goals at 45% to 65% from carbohydrates, 20% to 35% from fat, and 10% to 35% from protein. If you follow the Pritikin Principle it would be best to adjust your intake to meet the DRI guidelines.
Vine recommends beginning by taking note of your weight, body fat percentage and muscle mass using one of the above methods. Watch how these figures change over a few days – is your weight and muscle mass dropping, but your body fat increasing, despite regular workouts, for example? ‘That could mean you’re eating too many carbs and not enough protein to sustain your muscle,’ Vine says. Tweak your regime accordingly and monitor the numbers again. Repeat until it’s solely fat coming off.
Created in 2003 by cardiologist Arthur Agatston, this low-carb diet features three phases. The first phase is the most restrictive, limiting carbs such as potatoes and rice. Each subsequent phase becomes more lenient, and the diet emphasizes lean protein, unsaturated fats, and low-glycemic carbs such as nonstarchy vegetables. South Beach promotes lasting lifestyle changes, according to the Mayo Clinic. (21)

Lastly, as I indicated, all my lifts are going up, but my weight (and even LBM, assuming my scale is even remotely accurate) so is it fair to say that strength gains are not directly related to muscle gains? Is this the “beginner” phase that you speak of frequently? The scale would indicate that muscle is going down….. But my presses, squats, deadlifts are all up.
Glued to your desk every day for eight hours or more? You need to take action, says Richard Atkinson, M.D., a clinical professor of pathology at Virginia Commonwealth University. Get up and walk around for five minutes at least once an hour. Take a stroll around the office. Go talk to a coworker rather than sending her an email. Pace back and forth while talking on the phone.
Food and nutrition play a crucial role in health promotion and chronic disease prevention. Every 5 years, HHS and USDA publish the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, the Nation’s go-to source for nutrition advice. The latest edition of the Dietary Guidelines reflects the current body of nutrition science, helps health professionals and policymakers guide Americans to make healthy food and beverage choices, and serves as the science-based foundation for vital nutrition policies and programs across the United States.
×