Love your site and all your knowledge leads me to believe you may be able to help. I am STUCK. Can’t lose a pound. I am 5’6″, 126#, and have calculated my maintenance calories at 1850/day. I am eating this (or less) and working out as follows. Three times per week I do 55 minutes of cardio on the Arc Trainer (1050 calories, 4.2miles, according to the meter) followed by one hour of weights. Two times per week I take a Zumba or Pole class followed by a stretching and flexibilty class. By my calculation I should be burning a TON of fat but my scale hasn’t moved in months. Please help!

The theory behind the diet is not the reason you will lose weight if you follow this plan. Weight loss can only occur when you consume fewer calories than your body needs. In the introduction chapter the author makes numerous claims that you do not need to limit the quantity of food that you consume and then provides portion restrictions on many high calorie foods, such as nuts. It's appealing to hear you can eat unlimited quantities, but weight loss will not be achieved without limitations.


First, the bad news: Three-quarters of Americans have a "fat gene" associated with a 20 to 30 percent higher risk for obesity. But that doesn't mean you're destined to be heavy. For starters, research found that just believing that you have the fat gene may actually reinforce unhealthy behaviors. Plus, a British review found that exercise can trump your genetics: Physically active people with the fat gene are 27 percent less likely to become obese than couch potatoes who have it. We're not talking about training for a triathlon; the active people got just one hour or more of moderate-to-vigorous exercise a week. Aim for the recommended five hours a week (three days of cardio and two days of strength training) and you'll rev your weight-loss results even more.

The trick to keeping your appetite in check is avoiding foods that make you lose control. That's tough to do when you're surrounded by mouthwatering choices everywhere you go, but Stice says that a technique called mindful resistance can help. "If you're tempted to have a scone with your coffee at Starbucks, instead of thinking about how delicious it will taste, tell yourself you'll get health benefits (such as a healthier heart) from not having it," he says. "Doing this actually changes your brain by strengthening the area that helps you resist things and weakening the region that makes you think of treats as a reward." (Related: 7 Things You Never Knew About Your Willpower)
Thanks for the reply m8 much apriecated, i think like u say if im losing w8 still after my 2nd week and at 0.4( like u recomended) why not just carry on see what happens lol and eating alot more and im enjoying it and not low carb cycling and i dont wana go 2 mad and start losing to much weight and lose muscle as im already lean and trying get in single digits,i just goda b patient i guess and i reckon my maintance is 3000 and iv create a lil bit deflict by eating 300 under then my workouts are making it 500 or so hows that sound m8???
To start off, aim to do ab work 3 or 4 times a week on non-consecutive days with at least 24 hours of rest in between sessions, says Gagliardi. During those sessions, you can start with simpler moves like crunches, bicycle crunches, and planks. Even though you may only be directly targeting your abs 3 or 4 times a week, you should still be activating your core (aka, tightening your ab muscles) in every workout you do, says Gagliardi.
I mean, people lose fat on low carb diets, low fat diets, paleo diets, vegan diets, raw food diets, diets that involve eating “clean” instead of “dirty” or not eating after a certain time at night, and countless other types of diets that involve every gimmick, fad and method you can think of except the specific task of creating a caloric deficit. But yet, they have all caused people to successfully lose fat.
The conclusion? A caloric deficit is the sole cause of fat loss. Even if those calories come from the shittiest sources known to mankind, fat will STILL be lost. It’s not the source or the quality of those foods and the calories they provide… it’s the total quantity of it all. (Additional details here: Is Sugar Bad For You? How Much Should You Eat A Day?)
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